Find and Compare Local Contractors
Construction Defects and EIFS Information Home Inspections and Inspectors Find Local Building Codes Information on Asbestos and Removal Learn About Radon and Irradication Resources for Mold and Mildew Cleanup Get Proper Air Quality with Clean Ducts
Construction / EIFS Home Inspection Building Codes Asbestos Radon Mold Air Quality

Asbestos Inspection

Asbestos related health hazards in the home and in the workplace can be considered as among one of the most controversial issues of chemical contaminants in the last twenty years. Because asbestos exposure tends to take some time to manifest its symptoms, it was only in the past decade or so that its effects and implications entered the public consciousness when the first cases came out.

Housing materials of the past half-century and some appliances made before the 80s contained sufficient asbestos to have caused exposure. If you have only begun to be aware of the possibility that you may have materials in your home that may contain asbestos, then it is prudent that you might want to consider having an asbestos inspection.

An asbestos inspection can be as simple as finding a lab that should be able to assist you in collecting a sample of a material suspected of containing asbestos and then analyzing it, the costs of which are not expensive and usually below $50.

Or if you believe that a more thorough asbestos inspection may be necessary, you can contact a certified inspector for that purpose that may help you in not only identifying risky materials and components, but also giving you advice on how to dispose of such materials. Another good source to find help or assistance in an asbestos inspection is your local or state health departments.

Outside the home, the work place can also be a source of asbestos exposure. If your profession is involved in the manufacturing of asbestos related materials or other products, insulation work, ship-building, construction and building and even fire-fighting, you have to be aware of the conditions that define your work.

In the first place, if the industry you’re working for knows that it deals with high concentrations of asbestos, an asbestos inspection may not be necessary granting that the industry or company has the proper safeguards in place to protect you and your co-workers.

A company that knows the health risks involved also knows the potential for lawsuits and claims so it is in their best interest to provide their workers with protection. But then there are those who either ignore it or are hiding it. It is up to you to familiarize yourself with the problem and alert the proper authorities if there is sufficient reason to believe that exposure are present.