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Licensed Home Inspector

Due to that fact that just about every real estate transaction requires an inspection before the sale, the demand for a qualified licensed home inspector has never been greater.  In fact, home inspection is one of the fastest growing careers in America.  A licensed home inspector has very low overhead, low supply bills, and can enjoy a high profit with commitment. 

The licensed home inspector in the most basic terms performs a non-invasive visual examination of a residential building to identify flaws and defects in within specific components of the dwelling.  The seller or potential buyer of the residence contracts a licensed home inspector for a predetermined fee upon the mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing, and any other components agreed to prior to the inspection process.  When the inspection report is finished, it will describe and identify in writing the systems and structures that were observed and the material defects in observance and may contain recommendations for correction, professional evaluation and monitoring.  The inspection report will not suggest likely service life of components, evaluate paint or cosmetic treatments, or identify concealed or latent defects.

To become a licensed home inspector, some states require a written examination to be passed for certification and usually for a fee.  Many others, who live in states that do not have this requirement, may seek membership of organizations that offer certification, continuing education, career building materials such as brochures and internet advertisements and mentoring programs with online forums.  These organizations also require an annual fee but offer invaluable information and services tailored to the success of the inspector’s business and profitability.  The most prominent and nationally accredited organizations require that members complete at least 24 hours a year of continuing educational training, complete examinations, display the logo of the organization prominently, and mentor others via phone, in person, and online forums.