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Ohio Building Code

Whenever you are planning to build a new home, renovate an existing home and/or construct a new business you need to know the policy and procedure behind the building code.  If you are building something that is not up to code or does not follow policy and procedure you could lose your project and building license.  If you are planning a project in Ohio then you should be familiar with Ohio Building Code.

In the 1950’s and 1960’s Ohio was in the boom of construction on new homes and communities.  There was an Ohio Building Code in place at the time however it did not cover one, two and three family dwellings.  There was a regional committee established to develop the Dwelling House Code in Ohio that was taken on by most of the cities in Ohio.  The committee did not last very long though and the Dwelling House Code project under the Ohio Building Code was abandoned in 1968.

The Ohio Building Code was updated in the early 1990’s as the need arose again for a uniform code.  The Ohio Building Officials Association, also known as OBOA and the Ohio Home Builders Association got together and came up with a uniform code.  The first edition of the Ohio Building Code was published in 1993 with updates in 1996, 1999 and 2004.

At the time the Ohio Building Code was created in the 1990’ss it was only posted as a suggested code.  In the late spring of 2005 the Ohio Home Builders Association and the Ohio Legislature passed the HB 175 act.  This act made sure that there was a uniform Ohio Building Code state wide for residential buildings.

The Ohio Building Code is a statewide bit of legislation that everyone should understand if they are going to be partaking in residential construction.  It did take a while for the state of Ohio to pass the Ohio Building Code, but now that it is in place it is invaluable.