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Toxic Mold Syndrome

Nothing is more important than making sure your home is the safest and healthiest place for you and your family. That’s why learning about toxic mold syndrome is so important. Once you have learned about the possible health hazards of mold making a plan of action to prevent mold, or solve existing mold problems is much easier. There’s a lot of misinformation and confusion about mold out there, so be sure prepare yourself with the best knowledge before going forward. It’s not always clear just how a mold can be toxic, and although science is still revealing facts about how molds affect our health one thing is clear; certain molds are more dangerous than others. Always work towards identifying a mold first so that you know just how to treat the issue.

Toxic mold syndrome is often caused by mold spores that become airborne and are breathed in by occupants of the house. There aren’t overt signs of spores in the air, so the health risk is not immediately apparent. People sometimes go for months to years without realizing they are breathing in air affected by mold growth. The first step to solving toxic mold syndrome is recognizing the problem. If there is a somewhat foul odor in the air of your basement or attic you will want to check there first for signs of mold. It’s always easier to look for mold early instead of dealing with the ill effects of the syndrome later.

If you do have any symptoms of toxic mold syndrome, such as asthma or frequent bronchitis, you will want to see a physician as soon as possible. Many molds are harmless but if your home is infected by some of the more dangerous molds like Stachybotrys you will need to see a doctor. Your doctor will discuss all of the options for treatment, and with an ounce of prevention you can be sure to avoid future incidents.